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be scientists. there is all this talk about we have to do the recording to the science. while the talks might begin moving at a snail's pace -- like a caravan stuck in a sandstorm. everyone seems to be breaking your neck to get far away from the sides as possible. the world is already here. and whether the u.s. or any other country, including my own andhey are living in it -- i would hope maybe their kids would turn around and tell their parents, haven't you noticed? we are already there. >> that was ronny jumeau of the seychelles. before that, you heard jonathan pershing, the chief climate change negotiator. so far, the u.s. envoy tod stern has only held one news conference after one week and half. he was goodlett told another one today, but if you look at today's list of meetings, the event is the only one marked in red. a press conference was cancelled. ronny jumeau is with us here in doha, representative of the alliance of small island states. and we are joined by martin khor, executive director of the south centre in malaysia. ambassador, you're on the panel with the jonathan pershing, t
-gay industry did nothing but provide me and my family with false lies mass ka raiding as science. >> representative jackie spear joins me now live from capitol hill. congresswoman, thank you so much for joining us. my first question to you, why not just introduce legislation to ban it? why the nonbinding resolution? >> it is a state function to regulate professions, so it is incumbent on the states to look at the scope of practice within professions and determine whether certain practices are appropriate or not. the american psychological association and the american psychiatric association has said for more than 40 years that this is junk science. that there is no science that supports this conversion therapy or reparative therapy. so, this is an effort to put a spotlight on the issue and then from a federal point of view, i want to make sure that the taxpayer dollars aren't being spent on providing the services when they are not held to be scientifically effectively. >> okay, okay. we have got that. i want to hear more from young people at the news conference who went through c
-- it is like a science filmstrip. >> we were saying that for some reason, it is always such great timing politically because the republicans inevitably are acting like jerks at christmastime. here we go with the fiscal cliff and the debt and now they vote down the disabilities act right in front of bob dole in a real wheelchair. we're just like wow. >> absolutely. if anyone wants to make a music video using this song as the background alluding to all of that stuff you're talking about you know, i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: there you go. >> i can't speak for viacom's lawyers. >> stephanie: no. >> but i'm not going to say no. >> stephanie: here's a fun fact. co-wrote ten of the album songs. who is so handsome and rowic and talented. >> thank you. >> don't be a jerk dates from 2009. the joe wilson thing was happening. it just seemed like rudeness and you know, the lack of manners and civil discourses breaking down. you know, my cowriter, andy and i came up with this phrase, how about a song don't be a
, in the chemical laboratory, in the health science room, they broke a vial that had some of it in it. they evacuated that school. the fire department came in with all kinds of equipment to make sure they were not exposed to it. women who are pregnant, they say don't eat fish that has mercury in it and they cautioned them, the that there is surgeonfish you can eat. there are all kinds of reasons not to be exposed to mercury. yet we continue to put it in vaccinations as a preservative. in 1929, they came up with for marisol. they tested it on 29 people who had meningitis. they all died of meningitis, but the the mercury in the vaccination was not a contributing factor. so since 1929, it has never been completely tested and they continue to use it in vaccinations. it was not so bad when wenchow got a vaccination or two or three. but now they -- when one child got a vaccination or two or three. but now they get 29. the brain tissues to not -- it stays in there and it causes severe problems. during my chairmanship, for six years, we had four years of hearings. we had people from all of th
. >> clayton: in new york city, women waiting until they're 50 to get married or have kids, beyond science or-- >> right, right. >> clayton: is that a problem? and is marriage the traditional idea of marriage suffering because women want to go further and further into the workplace? >> the idea of traditional marriage is suffering for lot of reason. the article, wasn't the whole kit and caboodle, one aspect that i was passing on, if you will. there's certainly more to the issue, the purpose of my book, how to choose a husband. this was sort after teaser. but the whole attitude for marriage in general, for young people in particular is such a negative one and that's really the premise that i'm concerned about because when you start out thinking so negatively and taught things like never depend on a man and postpone marriage as long as possible. not that there's anything wrong with postponing it, but with that attitude you're probably going to have a self-fulfilling prophesy, but turn it around. this is a good thing. marriage, family-- >> governor huckabee on our show disagreed a little. >> oka
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. >> shepard: some survivors of super storm sandy got steamed staten island in new york. hundreds jammed in auditorium to talk with officials fema. people said they were frustrated with the recovery effort. >> you sit there -- you think it's a joke? >> billionaires. >> i don't. >> our communities are helping. red cross comes by, rings their bell come and get a hot meal and leave. we help each other. and that's what we want to do. but we need your support, sir. >> shepard: always quite new yorkers. staten island seriously the hardest hit spot in the city. new york's mayor has estimated the total damage i
can still invest in things like education, and training and science and research research. i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country, and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats, but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'd glass to see if you've been reading the papers lately that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so, if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. the senate has already passed a bill that keeps income taxes from going up on middle class families. democrats in the house are ready to vote for that same bill today. if we can get a few house republicans to agree as w
explanation in at this point to show you what happens when the social sciences and the humanities collide, you get total confusion here. because we had gordon melton here talking about what do we do with this sect/cult typology due to susanna's good question about christianity we tried to use that typology to describe the development of christianity and how it could have gone through all of our various stages. but here we have a believer and we always go to believers who has trouble would have trouble with any of that. wants to make a whole new category do i hear that a religion can simply be a brand new revelation with absolutely no connection whatsoever culturally to anything that came before it. and what could be the response to that? that's the entitlement of the person who is the believer but - let me get your comments. >> he did make reference a bit to the islam thing. he explained it very well. i had no idea what the bahai was. i had them confused with - well somebody said well whatever it is it's a pretty building go see it. that's all i've ever heard about it until today really. >> ye
degree who we want to keep here in science, technology, engineering, and math. in many cases, if they're not allowed to stay, they will have to return to other countries and the jobs will follow them, costing our country jobs. choose between them and allowing people here from countries other than mexico, india, and china. some of whom are high skilled, some of whom are low skilled, divorce group across the board and looking back at many of our own forebears, certainly mine mitigating circumstance family came to this country in the late 19th century and early 20th century, 1890's, 1905. they didn't have master's degrees they zrntpampede's they didn't have college degrees. and that's the case for many of our forebears. and here today their great grandson sits as a member of congress. and had a program then existed whereby they could arrive nellliss island and be here, i wouldn't be here today my father has a ph.d. but that's a legacy of his hardworking immigrant grandparents who came to this country without a college degree. and in many cases without something that's the equivalent of e
innovators among charities increase education for girls and minority students in science and technology. seven nonprofit will win the first global global impact awards today. among them $5 million to water, a group that drill wells for water across africa. and $5 million to donors choose a doctor or for new investors is a science and math classes with the college board for under represent students. google says innovations is underfunded among nonprofits. >> we will be back in a minute welcome back the time is 4 :15. the bay area continue to conducclean up the aftermathf a storm that knocked down trees and cut the power for thousands. the trees all over were not down on to cars and homes and power was cut to thousands. the rain is being partly blamed for causing giant sinkhole here in lafayette. workers spent most of the day cleaning up the hole with holes, as the raiders and dump trucks. city officials say an expose a foot storm pipe was designed to save for transport water underneath the road but somehow failed. the road keeton sunday morning creating a crack crater that is 80 ft. long
they are breaking up families. the republicans are trying to promote for science, technology and engineering and math, whether it's a high skilled visa or a low skilled advice a whether it's farm workers, domestic workers who clean hotepal this is all immigrant labor, and this apalo has an economic component in addition to the fact that many of their churches are telling them we can no longer side with this anti-immigration position. so it is changing out from under them and i think they are going to look for a way that they can change policy without a political backlash. joons we will be talking more about the upcoming elections a little bit later in the hour. a.b. stoddard, thank you. >> thank you. jenna: serious new concerns about a deteriorating situation in syria. why turkey says the bashar al-assad regime may be coming for it next and what our nato ally says it needs to protect its own people. we have a live report just ahead. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy d
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. lori: this is your fox business brief. stocks continue to search for direction on this the last trading day of the month. right now the dow is down 14 points but still holding above 13,000. >>> chevron and transocean reportedly agreed to change their offshore and safety operating procedures part of brazilian lawsuit seeking 20 billion in damages relating to a november 2012 oil spill. according to the reuters the agreement was drafted at the request for both companies with the federal prosecutors handling two civil lawsuits against them. >>> seattle-based boeing looking to enter federal mediation talks with one of its union. 23,000 member engineer group nowhere close to agreeing on pay raise and pensions. if no agreement is reached a strike is possible at the beginning of the year. that's the latest from the fox business network, giving you the power to prosper melissa: oil up only slightly but on track for the first monthly gain since august so can it hold on? phil flynn the price futures group in the pits of the cme with the lat
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. ends december 7th. ♪♪ you can help othersnk along the way. ♪ ♪ a portion of every bottle that they sell goes to fight ♪ ♪ breast cancer and i think that's swell. ♪ ♪ the more you take, the more they'll pay, ♪ ♪ so make them write a big check today. ♪ ♪ and if you're feeling a little slow, ♪ ♪ then 5-hour energy will help you go. ♪ ♪ so buy a bottle of pink lemonade and ♪ ♪ you can help fight breast cancer today. ♪ >> shepard: lawsuits. four women service members with the help of the american civil liberties u
inventive mind. for the last look. a political science professor likes to point out that in democratic nations highways are full of twists and turns to accommodate property and people. in autocratic they are straight because leaders can bulldoze whatever is in the way to get to a straight line. take a look at this interesting twist on that rule. the builders of this highway in china built their road in a straight line but as you can see the road has a house right in the middle of it. the homeowner refused to budge so they built around him. remember in the run up to the beijing olympics, the authorities tore down houses with abandon. perhaps times are changing in china. on the other hand it could be a fluke. my only remaining question is where is the family's mailbox. the answer is a, the vatican has been a permanent observer state of the u.n. since 1964. the holy sea has full rights in the body, the representative can make speeches, take part in debates. he can do anything except vote. thanks to all of you for being part of my program. i'll see you next week. >>> hello, everyone, i'm d
return, a sharp increase in the number of scanners filing fraudulent returns. science and technology editor is with us now. it looks like they have stolen tens of thousands of people's refunds. >>guest: potentially billions. part of the problem, is identifying that there is a problem. the i.r.s. says they do not know the extent of the problem and it is hard if them to track and identify that something like this is happening. >>shepard: explain what going on. >>guest: it has me disgusted. identity scammers buying something in a store is one thing but they filing fraudulent tax runs, that is something else. >>shepard: they would file my tax returns using their address and if i had a refund it would come back to them? >>guest: exactly. the challenge comes in because if you are like me you find out you getting a refund and you file as soon as you can and you can file in january. businesses and financial institutions do thought have to file their information with the government until the end of march. often the i.r.s. doesn't have the information it needs to verify or crosscheck what has
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. let's rock and roll. there is so much going on that every day presents another exciting issue. from financial regulation, iran getting a nuclear bomb, civil war in syria, fraud on wall street, destruction of medicare and medicaid. there are real issues here. having been a governor, i know that trade-offs are tough. things everyday exploding around the world that leave no shortage for exciting conversations. i want our viewer to understand why things have happened. at the end of the show, you know what has happened, why its happened and more importantly, what's going to happen tomorrow. >> cenk: we've the latest in the grand bargain negotiations. democrats gave they are first offer, republicans theirs. their both largely nonsense. we know they're going to meet somewhere in the middle but it has to play out. we're told nbc is a liberal network. interesting. andrea mitchell asked questions that are completely loaded in favor of cutting social security an
in fisheries and wildlife science from kansas state university in 1999, and her masters degree in biology from fort hayes state university in kansas. she loved the outdoors and was said to be at peace in nature. margaret anderson was living her dream, working with her husband at mount rainier national park as a united states park ranger. her duties were not confined to patrolling, but ranged from supervision of snowplow areas to medical coordination and instruction for her fellow staff members. anderson was described by her colleagues as a candid and honest co-worker who could always bring a smile to your face. on new year's day, anderson blocked the road with her patrol car to hinder the escape of a man who crashed through a checkpoint. little did she know at that time that the man was a suspect in an earlier shooting that wounded four people. the suspect shot at her while she was still blocking the road with her patrol car and she was fatally wounded. mr. speaker, national park ranger margaret anderson made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty. i urge passage of this bill to honor her
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, prosthetic arms and legs, it is amazing what science and medicine is doing for these young people .. but nobody should estimate, underestimate the magnitude of the rehabilitation challenge and the courage that it takes, day in and day out to try and come back from these terrible wounds and that is where there is not enough we can do for these kids. >> rose: are we over stretched? >> i don't think so. i think we were over stretched at the end of 2006 .. and particularly in the early months of 2007, during the surge in iraq, i think one of the hardest decisions i made, maybe the hardest decision that i made as secretary was extending the length of deployments in iraq and afghanistan from twelve months to 15 months, and we did it for about a year and a half. and two years, and the alternative was to cut short their time at home. so if they were only to serve twelve months in the theatre then they might only be home for nine months or eight months or something, and so the recommendation of all of the generals and others was do the 15 and let them have the year at home, but there is no
journal science" that claims the polar ice sheets are melting at record rates. up to five times faster than in the '90s. look at this video. it's fascinating. time lapse video from greenland. the report says that country and antarctica are losing 344 billion metric tons of ice a year equal to the weight of more than a million empire state buildings. scientists say these findings are important because the melting is causing sea levels to rise, and that makes coastal storms, say superstorm sandy, worse because of the massive flooding that's caused. [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- what starts with adding a friend... ♪ ♪ ...could end with adding a close friend. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. with his wife, danielle, almost every weekend. derrell hasn't been able to visit his mom back east in a long time. [ shirley ] things are sometimes a little tight around the house. i wasn't able to go to the wedding. [ emily jo ] since derrell couldn't get home, we decided to bring
,000 green cards that people with advanced degrease with science and engineering. doug mckelway live on the hill with the story this morning. this bill failed in september. why are republicans bringing it back now? >> reporter: bill, it failed back in september because it was brought up under suspension rules which requires 2/3 majority so it failed. it is coming back today under normal house rules which require simple majority and republicans are very confident after they that he have they have the votes of after the election results of november 6th they need to show strong advocacy of immigration. here is one of the strong supporters of the bill, raul labrador of idaho. melissa: at the same time we don't need to change our agenda. too many republicans say we need to abandon our agenda and become a different party. washington clearly doesn't need two liberal parties. >> reporter: it would do away with what is called the green card lottery, which gives 55,000 cards randomly selected by computer people from country with traditionally low immigration rates to the united states. that me
competing to win the army's next multi-million dollar contract. he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. we're trying to trick the brain into seeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital patterns recreate shapes already found in nature, and 3-d layering creates depth and shad dose where none exist. that's today's design. but developers already have one eye on tomorrow. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make believe. the military has seen the so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the americ
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
is for science and research. the u.s. condemns the launch saying it is the same technology that would be used to launch a ballistic missile. >>> alan simpson is cutting loose gangnam style. >> stop tweeting your breakfast. >> yes, the republican from wyoming wants to convince people to get involved with lowering the national debt. he asks young americans to use social media to sign a petition. i think that's going to be a successful marketing campaign. >> he's moving like gangnam style. >> soon you'll be doing it. >> a billion people will have seen that youtube video. >>> two prominent members of congress are standing by to join us live. they're getting ready to debate how to break the stalemate in the fiscal cliff negotiations. whether republicans should declare victory on taxes and move on. or are we all going over the fiscal cliff? let's see if we can work out a deal right here in the situation room. but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. at chevy's year-end event, we have 11 vehicles that offer an epa-estimated 30 mpg highway or better. yeah? hey.
behind in science and math. let's create five new programs. that has been the approach. >> reporter: as we speak treasury secretary tim geithner is meeting behind closed doors with the white house point man on congressional affairs with senate majority leader harry reid. perhaps we'll learn more about what kind of spending cuts the democrats are proposing after that meeting is done. jenna, back to you. jenna: we'll talk a little more about that now, doug. thank you very much. jon: yeah. let's go behind the scenes of the talks to avoid the fiscal cliff. it seems the framework for a deal actually might be taking shape. if so, what will it look like? david drucker has been nosing around a little bit. the associate politics editor at "roll call." when you hear senators and speaker of the house come out and talk it doesn't sound like they're all that close, david. are you optimistic? >> well i'm sort of on the fence here, jon. whenever you hear members of congress talk about any kind of fiscal cliff deal you have to approach it with a sort of believe everything and believe nothing attitu
of political science. they all said, that is really fundamental. [laughter] i discovered a little bit about how to be persuasive in the world.al million -- as cheng li's recognizes in his book, how to deal with the legal system may be the new government in china's biggest problem and the one they are least equipped to handle. we are all taking different slices looking at this reality. bill has given us some good perspectives. i like what he said about the impact of history. today, i want to look at three aspects briefly. the first, i will give the most time to. i think it has the least analysis in the public domain. it is the relationship of the party to the legal system. how should the party be structured to deal with the legal system? how should tea party's authoritative agency, the political middle -- how should the party's up the ortega agency that deals with -- political agency deal with the political system? as one of the litmus tests for the new chinese leadership. in order to provide a different perspective that relates to the historical and contemporary comparative law, i want to menti
-hbut some people wondered oveabout caffeine.es. the executive director of the center for science in the public interest said, "overdoing caffeine alone is actually pretty difficult to do. someone would have to make an effort to consume 40 or so 200-mg caffeine tablets." or... about this much 5-hour energy... in a single day. we recommend... not more than two per day. yeah, when we first came out with the product... you know, i made sure of one thing. if my family wasn't going to use it... if it wasn't good enough for my family if it wasn't safe for my family... i'm not gonna put it out there. i take it almost every day. and twice when i play tennis. this is our criteria that we have to be safe... if we're not willing to do it ourselves... we're not asking anybody else to do it. we're not gonna sell it. so, that's our approach to safety... that is a higher standard you can get. adt can help you turn on a few lights. access cameras from anywhere to help you keep an eye on things. even bring family in from the cold when you're not there. now get the advanced technology of adt starti
of the story is they will have more time for arts and music. our kids stink at math and science. there is no indication there is a link between this dump of federal and local money and whether results. the school system is one of the worst in the state. we gave them a free $100 million high school to motivate learning and test scores haven't changed at all. no one can connect this money with better result. isn't that the point to get smarter kids? martha: it is the point. we have seen in so many of our inner cities, the more money that gets thrown at the program over the years, we have seen a declining rate of grades and test scores. so we added more money, we are getting lower test scores. you want to make sure you will have quality in those hours. up believe the way to do that is to promote school choice which doesn't seem to be happening in this administration. >> what can do you with a few dollars for kids? before president obama became president congress passed a d.c. voucher program and was sending them to sidwell where the president's daughters go. one of the first things
and minority students in science and technology. google says this is underfunded among nonprofits. >>> well, light-rail service in los gatos will be talked about. they want to extend the light- rail service from winchester station in campbell to los gatos. it would cost about $175 million. the v.t.a. wants your opinion. a public meeting begins at 5:30 tonight. it will be at the campbell public library. >>> let's check in with tara who is following a few incy dents in the daly city area. >> that's right. we do have a couple of accidents. we can show you exactly what we're talking about. skyline boulevard south we have an incident right a -- an incident right there. and we have an accident 280 southbound from the john daly boulevard exit down to westborough boulevard and that's also causing some delays there. up next, we have a look at the san mateo bridge where -- i have no idea what the reason is because there's no accident whatsoever across the span but it's stop and go. it's been like this for at least, i would say, 45 minutes. so that's westbound traffic on the right-hand side as you mak
and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's justommosense, from td ameritrade.
and science you will eventually lose the innovation raise. you are not going to be able to educate people to the jobs that are available, those jobs will go elsewhere. our global growth and competitiveness and that in some ways is the most obvious link. we are not preparing people for the work place, the workplace of the twenty-first century, we are not going to longer be the world's most competitive and innovative economy. more surprising for me was brought to us by the former chief, former secretary of the army who talked about the problems of the education system and the relationships of the armed forces, the inability of fully 70% of americans actually qualify for service in the armed forces ought to be a red flag for anyone. there are other reasons for-obesity, a fair amount of it is people can't pass the basic skills tests. just imagine that. a country developed country, the most powerful country in the world, to get into the military. the analog for that is secretary of state, realizing how few people start to learn foreign languagess in a timely fashion, how many people can actual
country together. bill nye the science guy, naturally this really upset confederate soldier nicolas cage, but why and more importantly how does this happen? for the answer we turn to science. >> the estimate is that there's about 200 genes that actually make up the facial composition so if you think about a slot machine, what are the odds you would get 200 rows on a slot machine to line up. >> reporter: what's the number? what are the chances that i have a twin out there who looks exactly like me. >> 1 in a billion. >> reporter: 1 in a billion with a "b." . do people tell you look like anybody? >> oh, you look like elizabeth taylor when you were young or fran dresh sneer do i look like anybody famous? >> you look like you because you are famous. >> reporter: oh, my gosh, i love you. so the next time someone tells you look look like -- >> kevin durant. >> robert downey jr. >> jennifer lopez. >> this little guy they say he looks like bruce willis. >> reporter: i see it, i see it, really. >>> and there it is, and there is truth behind it. we all have a number of genes to make up our facial
, the bringing in a science and technology. you are a world bank guy. you went to harvard and dell was science and technology. here we are was tremendous knowledge in these fields. we talk about helping democracies. how do you see that from not only indicating these villages but scholarships and others, whether it is the french, the canadians, the brits, so that there are always for educational, the empowerment of women come are raising their status, inclusion. the american bar society and all those groups. what do you think about that? is it such that unless you have big muscular defense, big muscular foreign aid? i don't think america will ever be a wimp in anything, but i have an additional school of thought. what do you think? what could help that in america? >> thank you. generally, to speak a very frankly and what you have requested, the support of law enforcement in colombia has been helpful. that is a first step. as you said coming in several points to develop. increasing security capabilities and increasing the state's capability to promote human rights. in a case like ours, we have h
a speech in which he says he wants to use the tax hike to invest in training, education, science and research. when you're in a deep, deep hole, you're borrowing almost 40 cents of every dollar you spend, shouldn't you constrain yourself and not start new programs? or if you start a new needed program, shouldn't you reduce some less valuable program to pay for it instead of just taxing to create more programs? so not once in the speech did he discuss entitlements. it's the largest item in our government, entitlements. not once did the president of the united states discuss with the american people the problem of social security, medicare, medicaid are on an unsustainable path and are at great risk. shouldn't the president honestly talk to the american people about that? he didn't discuss our $16 trillion debt and how the debt commission that he appointed indicates that we're on an unsustainable path heading to a fiscal crisis. he did not discuss that. or the economic catastrophe that could occur if we don't get off this unsustainable path. the president should lead on these thing
proposition. last week i saw one of their science programs. they introduced something called crowd sourcing. it is individuals with their own computers take down complex intellectual problems and solve them and then up load the answers to help scientists. last week they saw these unbelievably complicated issues about protein. i like to bring crowd sourcing into this policy. maybe we can set them up in every state assistance could learn what is going on and there's a budget and then come up to the great hill there and see if we could take on a crowd sourcing of the federal budget. at least we're getting an education if we're paying attention. you can not be simple enough. we need the basics. what is the base as and broaden the base? them we would have an independent check on the work of the ceo and all the bookings. guest: thank you. that is a very interesting idea. the go to the federal budget, they have tax cuts or you can plug in which taxes the want to get rid of and how it affects the rate and individuals and their tax burdens. they also have one on the spending side. it is a terrific t
events are allowed the office of science and technology policy to identify work apps are. you can discuss value in a couple different ways. primarily whether it is valuable to democracy and people holding the government accountable, or valuable to companies such as members of my coalition of want to use it for new business opportunities or both. our coalition focuses on both vote for democracy and business opportunities are still not disclosed or standardized. although there is incremental progress without a legislative agenda, i think the white house can't get there. >> this is good and that leads us to the causal part of the program of the convening, perhaps. so we were talking about institutionalization. we have seen efforts along those lines. the open government initiative and direct it, although it certainly hasn't -- it's translated into something to get agencies moving in the same direction. we saw more of the principle problem with the leadership is saying do this and agencies were saying no, no. it was the mid-level folks. some of this is perhaps a one point ethics czar. norm ici
: coming up, you hear about it all the time. seniors falling victim to fraud. now there is science that explains why. then he was the first living person to be awarded the medal of honor in decades. he's telling his story. he's hanging out with pete, the guy who got his home fixed after the storm [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? often comes with a set of equally impressive instructions ? shouldn't something that's truly advanced, not need much explanation at all ? with the nokia lumia 822 on verizon, there's not much to learn because it's powered by windows... to let you do more than you ever imagined on your smartphone. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of your plan. only on verizon. advil pm® or tylenol pm. the advil pm® guy is spending less time lying awake with annoying aches and pains and mo
a cupcake right before bed, ken jennings? >> i would. science has forced me. >> thumb sucking, bad for you. >> your dentist is right and psychiatrist was wrong. >> what is the biggest misconception? what is the wrongest advice that parents give to their kids? >> the thing i always -- this one is sort of serious. don't talk to strangers and parents take this very seriously and make their kids scared of strangers. this myth of a strange kidnapper in white van, that never happens. kids need to be comfortable talking to strangers so if they get lost they can find help. >> ken jennings, nice to have you with us. you can have breakfast, you can pick up the food off floort and you can run with scissors. >>> still ahead this morning, relentless rain to tell you about in the west that's already proven deadly. more rough weather on the way. we'll talk about that. and don't waste any time getting that flu shot this year. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you
. jekyll technology parts. >> science, technology, engineering and math are fundamental to the growth of the economy and the united states obviously has work to do, my oldest daughter is doing her doctorate in math. there's a substantial contribution to national security in any case. with respect to the dr. jekyll and mr. hyde bit, economic growth is fundamental and innovation is the key engine for that and freedom is the foundation for that. i think we will see this play out in interesting ways globally including within china, and as we work to have a very open system economically and take advantage of technology, we also need to look at what needs to be done to deal with the threats of not just cyber but biotech and so on and look at doing that in partnership, and the partners we look at, and a substantial conversation about the rules of the road in cyberspace, we do that with many others, a fundamental issue. >> got a little bit from global security, the issue of the islands is primarily an issue of energy, and we are seeing it all over the world today, we don't have good mechanism
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> you're in "the situation room." a historic vote prompts massive celebrations on one side and harsh condeminations on the other. cnn has it covered like no one else can. >>> mitt romney has lunch at the white house with president obama. new details of what they talked about. >>> plus, this -- vice president joe biden goes shopping at costco. and he needed to phone for help. i'm wolf blitzer, you're in "the situation room." >>> a historic vote at the united nations voting to upgrade the palestinian authority. goes from nonmember observer entity to nonmember observer state. an implicit recognition of p palestinian statehood. 41 countries abstaining. the u.s. and israel among those voting no. >> today's unfortunate and counterproductive resolution places further obstacles in the path to peace. that is why the united states voted against it. the backers of today's resolution say they seek a functioning, independent, palestinian state at peace with israel. so do we. but we have long been clear that the only way to
energy and commerce committee. science is clear. cutting carbon emissions over the long term is key to reducing the risk of extreme weather. so i thank you for the opportunity to testify, and look forward to working together to help our fellow americans feel from hurricanes and, to ensure that we're all better prepared for similar storms of the future. thank you so much. >> thank you represented. and i would go -- welcome. >> thank you, madam chairman. very much appreciate the invitation to speak before this committee today. i am very proud to represent staten island and brooklyn. staten island was one of the hardest hit areas of all new york city. i was on the ground from the moment the storm started. the amount of devastation that i saw was unimaginable. 24 staten islanders lost their lives. families lost everything. homes were literally torn off their foundations. some collapsed. large boats, yachts were scattered deepened the neighborhoods piled up on two peoples homes. more than 100,000 were without power for weeks. people slept in a cold, damp home, and for his of to move to a
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